Allopurinol for Gout

Sometime in 2001, I had the worst physical pain of my life in the form of Gout in my big toe.  At the time, I had no idea what was causing the pain but I knew that the day before I’d consumed wine and walked several miles – not a typical activity for me at the time.  Ignorantly, I placed a water pack on it but it made the pain worse.  Once diagnosed, my friend and co-worker Lucas humorously suggested that King Henry VIII was the last person to have the condition.

Years passed with only one or two flares until the fall of 2015.  It struck in one toe, then the other and back again.  I was under a full scale assault and could only hit up the urgent care.  On the first visit, they gave me Colchicine and Prednisone which wiped it right out.  Unfortunately, it was back within weeks and began oscillating between toes again until it decided to hit my right wrist.  Ouch!  This time it was clear I had to get to a doctor.

A short visit concluded with another prescription of Colchicine and Allopurinol.  For years, I’d resisted requesting the allopurinol because I don’t like the idea of being dependent on any prescription medication.  This stuff works!  It is not a pain medication but rather a preventative medicine.  My overall health appears to have improved dramatically since starting nearly 2 weeks ago.  The first week, I took 1-100mg pill per day.  The second week which is almost done, I’m taking 2-100mg pills per day.  The third week, I’ll take 3-100mg per day.  It feels like my entire body has been flushed of toxins and garbage.  My urine is darker which at the very least gives me the psychological relief that I’m getting rid of junk acid.

If you’re on the fence about Allopurinol, reconsider.  Your life deserves it!

The Lopez Family

Hello to everyone from Tembags. We arrived in about January of 1982 and left in May of 1985. I remember with great fondness our good friends such as the Herrs, Crafts, Foulds, Rendons, Carters, the Johnsons, the Steels (sp?) and many others whose name, but not faces, escape me. My father, like many others, worked in the mine, my sisters Tamara and Vanessa and I attended the school where my mother, Twyla, was the General Music teacher. It would be really great to meet with others townmates we knew. For those of you on My Space, I’ve created a new group for the Tembagapura. Feel free to join by going to http://groups.myspace.com/Tembagapura [Jack’s links are dead]. In addition, I am there under www.MySpace.com/paraaz [Jack’s links are dead]. Love, Jack Lopez-Turner

Saerudin

Saerudin
Udin Stiki
Birthday: 15/03/82
Birth: No
MALANG, JAWATIMUR, INDONESIA
Not Married
Partner: IBA
Arrival: MAY 2002
Departure: 2002
Family
LA HAILANE(ANEX)BARACK V NO 240 IS MY BROTHER HE WORKING IN GRASBERG MY FAMILY ONLY THOSE THANKS YOU VERY MUCH I HOPE YOU CAN TAKE ME FOR WORKING IN TEMBAGAPURA IF I FINISHING SCHOOL I WANT YOUR HALPING ME.
Experience
AFTER MY BROTHER WORKING IN TEMBAGAPURA I CLAIM KNOWLEDGE IN MALANG(JAWATIMUR) FROM IT I HOPE YOUR CAN HELPING US FOR PAYING SCHOOL MONEY THANKS YOU TIMIKA PAPUA CHILD FROM SAERUDIN.

Markus Yonas Dibitau

Markus Yonas Dibitau

van_neck@yahoo.com

Birth:� Yes

City:� Yogyakarta

State:� Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta

Marriage:� Yes

Spouse:� yess

Family

Program beasiswa, tolong di berikan pada anak2 karyawan lokal.supppaya kami juga dapat merasakan program tsb.Jangan hanya pendatang saja yang di perioritaskan.

Tom Henderson

Tom Henderson

thender@bgmi.com

Birthday:� 02/19/59

Birth:� No

Elko, Nevada, USA

Spouse:� Eileen Jeanette

Arrival:� February, 1989

Departure:� March, 2002

Family

Eileen: Elko, Nevada Michelle: Moscow, Idaho Nick: Elko, Nevada Jennifer: Elko, Nevada

Experience

I am eternally grateful for the opportunity to live and work in T-town and with the great people we met and came to enjoy along the way. Freeport was an incredible company to work with. I never observed any demonstration of willful violation of social or environmental degredation within the work area condonded by the company. I no longer work with Freeport – but I will always hold them in high regard. We certainly miss not living in Indonesia and there are many days that we wish we were back there. It is just not our turn any longer.

Philipus B. Wally

Philipus B. Wally

philipus_w@neworleans.com

Birthday:

14/12/83

Birth:

No

City:

Bandung,indonesia

State:

Jawa barat

Country:

Indonesia

Marriage:

No

Spouse:

bernadus

Arrival:

02 1999

Departure:

02 2001

Family

i really gladd to see these site , just because i ever been stay in tembagapura when i was living there especially for my family members in kuala kencana Mr.Runaki at RT 4 RW A i hope they are in good health and also siomai and paul luvitar in mile 32 (asrama Brimob Mile 32)and god always blessed they are where ever they for all my friends who stands on these site please contact to me immediatelly cos now i’m in bandung now so just send me a letter by e-mail okkkkkkkkk KISS BY AIBON City IN Timika philipus_w@neworleans.com @unitedfool.com @yahoo.com @bisnispapua.com special thank&amp#39;s for the provider who designed these site at the end kiss by Papuan people…….???

Experience

i cann’t describe it cos in Tembagapura it’s too exotic and most beautifull it’s more than I suppose before especially in Ridge camp & Kuala kencana in hidden valley which almost like in swz.

LIVING IN IRIAN JAYA by SueAnne Davidson

I was surprised to be handed two copies of Network News by a friend as I was boarding an aeroplane, with the suggestion that I “read these and maybe write something”. Although I grew up on a farm, I didn’t feel like a rural woman anymore. I spent the best part of the next hour reading the copies and realised that, while I may not be rural, where I was living was definitely remote.

I live with my husband and two young children at Tembagapura, Irian Jaya, Indonesia. Until August 1996 I had not heard of the place, but my husband had accepted a job there then our steep learning curve began.

To reach Tembagapura you fly half a day east from Jakarta to land on an airstrip carved from thick jungle growth in the lowlands of Irian Jaya. All travel from here is by four wheel drive, climbing to 1850 metres in the next 110 kilometres a journey which takes one and a half hours. With an annual rainfall of 7600 millimetres, visibility is usually poor due to thick cloud and heavy rain; however, on a rare clear day the views are spectacular as you climb into the highlands. It is better to concentrate on the views than the fact that you are travelling along an often onelanewide dirt track clinging to the side of the mountain.

Only one small section of the road is sealed to prevent it sliding into the valley below. This is the only road up the mountain and is shared by four wheel drives, heavy mine equipment and graders which are constantly at work. Everything needed to supply one of the world’s largest copper/gold mines plus 10,00-plus staff comes up this road – from packets of biscuits to 250 tonne trucks (in pieces!). Flat tyres are common (Nine in two days is my husband’s record to date.) as are overheated brakes and engines. Home is usually a welcome site after this trip.

Due to the mountainous terrain, space is at a premium in Tembagapura; so the most common form of accommodation is in apartments. Ours is on the first floor and this can make life with young children very trying at times. Backyards can be such sanity savers for mothers as well as children!

Amenities in town are quite good with an American as well as an Indonesian school, supermarket, coffee shop, library, restaurant, bar and sports facilities. Outdoor activities happen before the daily rain sets in at noon.

The supermarket is stocked with a mixture of Australian and Indonesian groceries. Supply can be erratic, while fruit and vegetables are often expensive and old. It has not been possible to buy wine in town since Christmas and Fosters beer is currently on special at half price a bargain at $25 a carton. Morning tea at the coffee shop is often interrupted by squeals from the supermarket such as – There’s yoghurt in the dairy fridge! Edible beans in the vegie section!Plain flour is back on the shelves!

Generally, women are not allowed to drive or work and many wives find this a hard adjustment to make. Husbands leave before dawn to go to the mine, another half hour drive by four wheel drive to reach 4000 metre altitude. The last section of the trip is usually done by cable car which only occasionally malfunctions to leave people suspended in mid air!

The postal service tends to be unreliable. Initially communication was difficult, but after eight months we have finally received a telephone access code so can now phone home and enjoy receiving E-mail from friends.

Living in a remote mining town (a first for me) in Indonesia is certainly challenging but is also a great way to get glimpses of a country which has been described as one of the world’s last wildernesses. I am learning the Indonesian language and my children are mixing with a wide variety of children from all over the world. I don’t see us being here forever but feel lucky (most days) to be here now and look forward to regular holidays home.

SueAnne Davidson, Irian Jaya.

Alexis Marshall

alexis marshall

m_lexi@hotmail.com

Birthday: 05/11

Birth: No

Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

Not Married

Arrival: September, 1996

Departure: summer 1998

Family

Bob Marshall – st. johns, works & lives there Sarah Marshall – Ontario, in 4th year university Joy Brake – Halifax

Louis M. “D.D.” Scarabin, Jr.

Louis M. “D.D.” Scarabin, Jr.

Birthday: 08/01/40

Not born in Tembagapura.

Carriere, MS, USA

Spouse: Marilyn A. Scarabin

Arrival: April 27 1976 and August 1995

Departure: December 1982 and September 1997 (Kuala Kencana)

Family

Deron Patrick Scarabin, Jason Louis Scarabin, Joshua Henry Scarabin & Kessie Helen (Scarabin) Bratko

Experience

Living in Tembagapura had to have been one of the greatest experiences of my life. The work was rugged and challenging. The weather was often dreary and rain or fog prevailing, but on a clear day or night it is one of the most spectacular and beautiful places in the world. What really sticks out in my mind is the bonding that took place between diverse nationalities and cultures particularly the sub-diversity of the Indonesian people and cultures. There in Tembagapura was a collection of some of the hardest working most wonderful people you would ever meet inspired and motivated by the challenges and opportunities presented by Freeport and the Indonesian Government. People came and left, some serving shorter periods than others, some returning after a pause in the world they had previously lived in, but the progress continued, the producton increased, and the individuals, families, and processes grew and improved. We all left a better person for having lived there. I had the opportunity to share this experience with my wife and three young sons, to witness the birth of my daughter onsite, to live in Hidden Valley and Kuala Kencana, to work throughout the contract of work area, including Timika and Portsite, and to serve four years in Jakarta. I thank the management of Freeport, the Government of Indonesia, my co workers, my family, and the people of Indonesia for this opportunity.